Changing flying from a craft to a science: what went right, and what went wrong, in World War II

I have just finished  a working paper called  NOT FLYING BY THE BOOK: SLOW ADOPTION OF CHECKLISTS AND PROCEDURES IN WW2 AVIATION. It tells how, in 1937 shortly before World War 2,  the American air forces invented a much better way to train new pilots, and to fly complex aircraft and missions. What they invented is now used all over the world, by all licensed pilots and military aviators. But during the war, even American pilots resisted switching to the new way of flying. The only full-speed adopters were the strategic bombing forces attacking Germany and Japan. The US Navy, despite being one of the 1937 inventors, did not fully make the switch until after 1960!

Precise flying was a matter of life or death.

Precise flying was a matter of life or death.

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3 thoughts on “Changing flying from a craft to a science: what went right, and what went wrong, in World War II

  1. Heya! I realize this is somewhat off-topic but I had to ask.
    Does operating a well-established blog like yours take a massive amount work?
    I’m brand new to running a blog however I do write in my journal everyday.
    I’d like to start a blog so I will be able to
    share my personal experience and feelings online.
    Please let me know if you have any suggestions or tips for brand new aspiring blog
    owners. Appreciate it!

  2. The comments by Abe and Maritza are both examples of a new kind of blog spam. The comments are utterly innocuous and general – they could be posted to ANY blog. Their purpose, I believe, is to get the ULR into a link. I guess the goal is to improve the Google page rank score, but I’m not sure how that would work. Can anyone enlighten us?
    By the way, I trash most comments like this, but I though it would be interesting to let these two through as examples. I altered the URLs to remove that incentive.

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