Scrivener 3 for Academic Writing: An In-Depth Review

I use a variety of specialized software for note taking, managing academic papers, etc. Rather than write my own review of Scrivener, I link to someone else’s here. I added a comment to her post, about using it with bibliography software.

Feel free to add links to your own favorite Scrivener reviews, in the comments. There is a fair amount of overhead in learning Scrivener, but for longer projects (eg > 10,000 words) it saves writers from “multiple version hell.”

In this in-depth Scrivener 3 review, I show you why Scrivener is the best word processor for academic writing. Unlike Word, Scrivener 3 keeps all your research and writing in one place. Its best features? The ability to drag and drop to reorganize your draft, split screen mode, word targets, and linguistic focus.

Source: Scrivener 3 for Academic Writing: An In-Depth Review

Science policy fellowships @ UCSD

For STEM doctoral students at UCSD who have policy interests but are not in social science fields. I have advised several students in this program, and it has been useful for all of them.

Drawing applicants from UC San Diego’s STEM related programs, each year the School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS) selects three doctoral students from across campus and pairs them with a GPS faculty advisor to explore the policy implications of their dissertation research.

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Drone crashes: EEs always underestimate the difficulty of precision manufacturing!

In documents filed in federal court this week, the San Francisco company Lily Robotics blames its demise on excessive product demand and a funding drought.  Source: Lily details failure, refund plans in bankruptcy filing

After getting burned by one Kickstarter project that died, I realized that very smart EEs think that if they can make 3 prototypes, everything else is just “details.” But high-volume, tight-tolerance manufacturing is its own field, and competition from excellent companies is stiff. So even if it eventually succeeds, by the time a Kickstarter hardware project has filled its initial orders,  conventional companies will have equivalent products in the stores.

For my former students in BGGE: Hong Kong Disneyland, reprised

Prof. Steph Haggard and I taught a course on government/private sector relationships for many years, called BGGE (business and government in the global economy – pronounced “big-e”). One of the cases was a 2-day slog through the negotiations between Walt Disney Corp.(WDC) and the Hong Kong government, about setting up the first Disney theme park in China.

The punch-line of the case was that WDC would win whether the park was profitable or not, because it received royalties as a fraction of the gross revenue. It also extracted lots of favorable financing from the HK government.

According to this article, one of the feared scenarios in the case has happened. WDC built a second Disney park in China (Shanghai), and within six months of its opening, it is siphoning away visitors. And sure enough, it looks like WDC and the HK government are playing the same game again: pumping subsidies into the park to boost attendance, with the side effect of helping WDC.

Source: Hong Kong Disneyland, Seeking Return to Profit, Plans $1.4 Billion Upgrade – The New York Times

Excerpts:

But the scope of the enhancements also reflects the difficult spot in which Hong Kong Disneyland finds itself. Despite more than $600 million in added attractions in recent years, including three new themed areas and a nighttime parade, the park lost about $20 million last year, according to financial filings.

The renewed focus on Hong Kong Disneyland, with its lush gardens and collection of classic Disney rides, comes just six months after the opening of the Shanghai resort, which generated global headlines for its opulence. Disney has suggested that the Shanghai park will attract 10 million visitors in its first year; four million people visited in the peak summer months alone.

Hong Kong leaders, already feeling insecure about the ascension of Shanghai as a financial capital, do not want their Disneyland to be viewed as a lesser property.